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 General

WBS August 2016 Market Update

Aug 19, 2016

Take a look at a whole-home remodel in North Fond du Lac, see the latest trends in housing costs, read a recent Q&A article in the LMB Journal with one of our customers, and learn what the industry plans to do about labor shortages.


Inspiration

A Whole-Home Remodel in North Fond du Lac

Before Wisconsin Building Supply designer Koral Boden got her hands on this month’s featured house, it was dated and could be described as “colorful.” The kitchen countertops were yellow laminate, and the master bathroom had pink carpet and countertops.

So in order to help with the transformation – the entire home was remodeled – Koral worked with the homeowners to come up with a design that would update the look and functionality of the kitchen and two and a half bathrooms.

She started in the kitchen with DuraSupreme Cabinetry around the perimeter in a raised-panel cherry with a Chestnut stain and Charcoal glaze. The island is white with a gray accent, and the countertops are a beautiful Cambria Quartz in Lincolnshire. She added a wine bar and storage rack at the far end of the kitchen.

The half bath, which is just off the kitchen, was designed in the same style, as was the master bathroom, though it has a Cambria Quartz countertop in Torquay. A second bathroom has DuraSupreme Cabinetry in a raised-panel knotty alder wood with a Poppyseed stain and a Cambria Quartz Lincolnshire countertop.

Koral’s design for this whole-home remodel in North Fond du Lac brought a spacious, functional, and modern look to what was once a dated, cramped home.

See on Houzz


Guidance

2016 Cost of Housing Trends


WBS in the News!

WBS Mentioned as Favorite Business Partner of Degnan Design Builders

One of the biggest compliments we can receive is positive feedback from our customers, so we were thrilled to be mentioned in a recent Q&A article in the LMB Journal by Abe Degnan of Degnan Design Builders in DeForest. Abe mentioned that Wisconsin Building Supply is one of his favorite business partners. Thanks, Abe!

Read the full article here


Experiences

Building Industry Continues to Grow, While Labor Shortage Woes Remain

If you’ve had a hard time finding skilled laborers in recent months and years, you’re not alone. While the number of building permits issued in Wisconsin continues to rise, the construction workforce has only returned 40 percent of the workforce lost during the housing market downturn. This means an increase in work, but not enough skilled laborers to get the job done.

Besides land access and development, labor shortages continue to be the largest challenge facing the construction industry. Skilled labor shortage trends from 2015 have carried into the 2016 construction season. But despite these challenges, demand and growth have continued at a steady pace in 2016. Multi-family units have increased by 31 percent, and single-family units have increased by 15 percent year-over-year. Because the pool of quality workers is strained, construction schedules continue to expand, which increases the costs of projects.

The construction industry plans to confront the challenge of filling the workforce deficit by appealing to the younger generation. Recruitment and investment in skill-based education programs and partnerships with local trade schools are vital keys to the revitalization of the industry. According to the Bureau of Labor, the construction industry needs for labor will outpace all other industries over the next several years, with projections of up to 25 percent growth. Additionally, the demand for manufactured wall panels on larger volume projects continues to increase. These components reduce construction time and lower project site headcounts, which offsets the challenge of skilled labor availability. The primary difference between manufactured components and the traditional building process is that components drive the timeline for decisions, design, and production into the front end of the project before field work begins. This, in turn, allows work crews the ability to shorten the build cycle.